The Office of Experiments Neal White
-- PAST WORKS / RESEARCH
 

 


Neal White is an artist and researcher with a background in art and technology. His work draws on a recent history of art which has roots in experimental practice, conceptual and socially engaged forms.

In his collaborative practice with the Office of Experiments (founded 2004) he has led a series of projects that concern experimental forms of research. Frequently undertaken with fellow artists, academics and others within the network, the focus reflects on the growth of the techno-scientific and military industrial complex and is grounded in fieldwork that includes observational and documentary forms of media, temporary interventions and social or conceptual apparatus for experimentation, including bus tours and site visits.

He has worked closely with other institutions ranging from the Centre for Land Use Interpretation, USA and the Arts Catalyst UK to the Henry Moore Insitute and Max Planck Insitute, Berlin. As an artist, White has collaborated with writers, academics and activists, curators and architects, as well as other artists, including; Lawrence Norfolk (UK), N55 (DK), John Latham (UK), Steve Rowell (USA), Antony Hudek (CH), Sophie von Olfers (DE) and Tina O'Connell (IRE). He co-curated Dark Places at John Hansard Gallery (UK) in 2009 and has exhibited Internationally with Office of Experiments, from Apexart- New York (2010), FACT- Liverpool (2008), as an individual at Natural History Museum, London (2003) and with Soda at Lux Gallery, London (1998) and Moderna Museet, Stockholm (1998).

He was a co-founder of the acclaimed art and technology group Soda in 1997 (97-02), and was a Director of O+I, from 2007-9 (formerly Artist Placement Group). His work has been funded through numerous awards from Arts Council England, The Henry Moore Foundation, Washington DC Arts and Humanities Commission, Heritage Lottery Fund and the Gulbenkian Foundation. He lives in London and is currently Professor of Media Art and Director of the Experimental Media Research Group at Bournemouth University.

 

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